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I N F O R M A T I O N - A R T

     Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum viditur*
Tami Sutcliffe (C) 2013

About this site
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Art or information?
Information Science
Design
Visual Culture

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Relationships between visual information and visual art:

Is visual art a specialized kind of information, which can be manipulated using the tools of formation science? What are the defining informational characteristics of visual art, if this is the case?

Or does visual information act as the raw material of art, the essence which combines with media and action to yeild expression? Do the traditional divisions of information as a raw material support this idea of art-making?

How often does a piece of pure information become valued as art?
What are the steps leading to this valuation?
How would we define ‚Äúpure‚Ä?

Does art ever “decay†away from cultural artifact into raw information, losing whatever artistic meaning was previously associated with it? What causes this decay?

Are there layers of meaning which visual art must have to contain value?
Can the same thing be said of visual information?



Mathematical imagery: "The connection between mathematics and art goes back thousands of years. Mathematics has been used in the design of Gothic cathedrals, Rose windows, oriental rugs, mosaics and tilings. Geometric forms were fundamental to the cubists and many abstract expressionists, and award-winning sculptors have used topology as the basis for their pieces. " more»

Da Vinci drawings - animated. Behind the diversity are a series of unifying themes in Leonardo’s vision of how the world works. The dominant theme is the mathematical operation of all the powers of nature. Eye of Science: Combining scientific exactness with aesthetic appearances.

Pictures that lie: "A picture is worth a thousand words, unless of course, it is a fake one. "Pictures that Lie" exposes examples of media photographs that have been doctored, altered, or otherwise manipulated before being publicly released.

Art of Science: Imagery produced in the course of research

JunkCharts: Recycling chartjunk as junk art

Data as art: Designs making people aware of context.

Iota Center: The art of abstraction in the moving image.

SwarmSketch: an ongoing online canvas of distributed design.

Their Circular Life: a 24-hour cycle of everyday urban life unfolds.

Phylotaxis: Derived from the Fibonacci Sequence.

Complexification: Computer programs creating graphic images.

= = = = = = = = = =
Research Question:
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How often do the names selected by user-curators to identify their image collections in Pinterest fit within Panofsky's three tiers of subject matter meaning? [pre-iconological (primary, formal or natural), iconographical (secondary, thematic or conventional) or iconographical(intrinsic, intuitive or contextual)] [more]

thoughtBoxes:

List of Information Artists
Compiled by Stephen Wilson , Professor, CIA Program , Art Dept, San Francisco State University

Link collection
Experiments, examples, toys and conferences

Humor
"Humor may be defined as the kindly contemplation of the incongruities of life, and the artistic expression thereof." -Stephen Leacock

Online drafts
Google-docs space for storing drafts in progress.

Methods
Data and links related to assorted research methodologies are being stored in this blog.


Notes
"Art that explores technological and scientific frontiers is an act of relevance not only to a high-brow niche in a segregated corner of our culture. Art, like research, asks questions about the possibilities and implications of technological innovation." - from "Information Arts: Intersections of Art, Science and Technology" by Stephen Wilson

Please define...

information
information science
informatics
information theory

art
aesthetics
theories of art
visual culture

"The secret of life is to have a task, something you devote your entire life to, something you bring everything to, every minute of the day for your whole life. And the most important thing is -- it must be something you cannot possibly do. "- » Henry Moore



Events

The Art World Is Flat Inaugural Symposium C6: international group confronting the new challenges and possibilities of our interconnected world. more»

EVA:Electronic Imaging, the Visual Arts & Beyond: cross-sectoral, multi-disciplinary, local & global set of events for people interested in new technologies in the cultural sector. more»

International Conference On The Histories Of Media Art, Science And Technology: art and new media, art and technology, art-science interaction, and the history of media as pertinent to contemporary art. more»

DIME2006: 1st International Conference on Digital Interactive Media Entertainment and Arts: "In this call for artworks we appeal directly to research artist or teams working in the convergence between disciplines, creating innovative technologies or just re-engineering existing ones through meanings and concepts." more»
Doodles, Drafts, and Designs: Industrial Drawings from the Smithsonian Institution - Online Exhibition 2004 more» TED: Technology, Entertainment & Design conference The first TED included the public unveiling of the Macintosh computer and the Sony compact disc. more»
ArtBots: international art exhibition for robotic art and art-making robots. People all over the world are making work that combines art and robotics and they're asking interesting, important questions about art, technology, creativity, responsibility, authorship, and consciousness. more»


"Midway along the journey of our life I woke to find myself in a dark wood, for I had wandered off from the straight path."
- Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) from "Inferno," cto. 1, l. 1-3, The Divine Comedy (c. 1307-

*Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum viditur translates to "Whatever is said in Latin sounds profound."

Editor: Tami Sutcliffe
Suggestions for links are always welcome. Send them here.
Coding, format, and on-site content copyright ©2013
Last updated 01.01.13

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